Journal of Linguistics, Literary and Communication Studies https://utafitionline.com/index.php/jltcs <p>The <strong>Journal of Linguistics, Literary and Communication Studies</strong> is a high-quality open-access, peer-reviewed, and refereed multidisciplinary research journal, dedicated to serving society in the global dissemination of information through an unparalleled commitment to quality, reliability, innovation, and research work. The journal welcomes and acknowledges high-quality theoretical and empirical original research papers, case studies, review papers, literature reviews, and conceptual frameworks in the fields of Linguistics, Literature, and Communication Studies. Journal of Linguistics, Literary and Communication Studies engages its noble efforts for the development and endeavours to give you the best.</p> en-US <p><a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/" rel="license"><img src="https://i.creativecommons.org/l/by-nc-sa/4.0/88x31.png" alt="Creative Commons License" /></a></p> <p>This work is licensed under a <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/" rel="license">Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License</a>.</p> Sun, 14 Jan 2024 00:00:00 +0000 OJS 3.3.0.16 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss 60 Critiquing the meaningfulness of Sukuma Cattle names: A non-Philosophical semantic stance https://utafitionline.com/index.php/jltcs/article/view/399 <p>The article critiques the meaningfulness of Sukuma cow names as the answer to theoretical contribution within the frameworks of linguists and philosophy in assessing the semantics of cattle names. The exertion used Descriptive, Indirect Reference, and Onomastics Theories. The former describes names as identical to the objects’ descriptions; the latter indicates that names are more than simply the object to which they refer. The last refers to the theory, which shows the origin of names they came from.&nbsp; The study used structured interviews with 4 sukuma speakers from Mwamashimba village of Tanzania who were selected purposively via snowballing technique. It was found that <em>Lunya, Nyankole, Mabhú, Mkala, and Shilungu</em> are Sukuma cow names whose meaning is meaningless as they have no symbiotic relations with the semantic content, they refer to rather than just labelling of objects, places, colour, and structure. Based on the findings, it was concluded that Sukuma cow names are meaningless and not rigid designators as claimed in the philosophy of language rather than identification labels, which are very important in any speech community in stirring emotion, cultural awareness as well and historical connection between the present and the past. &nbsp;</p> Chipanda Simon Copyright (c) 2024 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 https://utafitionline.com/index.php/jltcs/article/view/399 Sun, 14 Jan 2024 00:00:00 +0000 What Next for the ‘Text’? Popular Culture and Literature Today https://utafitionline.com/index.php/jltcs/article/view/509 <p>Literary studies have evolved over the past few decades to include popular culture fields as text. Proponents of this inclusion argue that songs, memes, tweets, local dialects, and slogans say as much about people and cultures as traditional texts – perhaps even more. The opinion is that, by over-relying on traditional text for literary fodder, scholars shut themselves off from current and relevant information about the rapidly evolving literary and cultural landscape. The disregard for popular culture also turns away a younger audience that seems to prefer a more informal approach to art and literature. Thus, the reading of popular cultures as text is forcing the literary field to re-evaluate the fundamental principles that define its work. Literary scholars have to rethink their traditional ideals of writing, reading, and teaching texts. Yet, there remains a reluctance to accept such informal forms of communication as memes and tweets as legitimate literature. Popular culture is not well regarded in literary studies and some stakeholders fear its classification as text could dilute the impact of the field. This paper investigates this trepidation by analyzing how reading popular culture fields as text impacts the identity of text in literary studies. Based on selected tenets of Literary and Cultural Studies (LCS) Research, particularly cultural literacy, this paper examines the legitimacy of different popular culture formats to determine if they hold enough value to warrant literary analysis. The author argues that many forms of popular culture deserve a closer look, especially through a literary lens, because they reveal the cultures, beliefs, and practices of their audience. He suggests that the incorporation of popular culture into literary studies offers many opportunities for growth and discovery but only if implemented diligently. Finally, this paper investigates why the literary field is reluctant to read popular cultures as text and how scholars can navigate this inclusion to create a more cohesive definition of text.</p> Sammy T. Maina Copyright (c) 2024 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 https://utafitionline.com/index.php/jltcs/article/view/509 Thu, 25 Apr 2024 00:00:00 +0000 Photographic Frames in the Westgate Mall Terror Attack Coverage https://utafitionline.com/index.php/jltcs/article/view/547 <p>Literary studies have evolved over the past few decades to include popular culture fields as text. Proponents of this inclusion argue that songs, memes, tweets, local dialects, and slogans say as much about people and cultures as traditional texts – perhaps even more. The opinion is that, by over-relying on traditional text for literary fodder, scholars shut themselves off from current and relevant information about the rapidly evolving literary and cultural landscape. The disregard for popular culture also turns away a younger audience that seems to prefer a more informal approach to art and literature. Thus, the reading of popular cultures as text is forcing the literary field to re-evaluate the fundamental principles that define its work. Literary scholars have to rethink their traditional ideals of writing, reading, and teaching texts. Yet, there remains a reluctance to accept such informal forms of communication as memes and tweets as legitimate literature. Popular culture is not well regarded in literary studies and some stakeholders fear its classification as text could dilute the impact of the field. This paper investigates this trepidation by analyzing how reading popular culture fields as text impacts the identity of text in literary studies. Based on selected tenets of Literary and Cultural Studies (LCS) Research, particularly cultural literacy, this paper examines the legitimacy of different popular culture formats to determine if they hold enough value to warrant literary analysis. The author argues that many forms of popular culture deserve a closer look, especially through a literary lens, because they reveal the cultures, beliefs, and practices of their audience. He suggests that the incorporation of popular culture into literary studies offers many opportunities for growth and discovery but only if implemented diligently. Finally, this paper investigates why the literary field is reluctant to read popular cultures as text and how scholars can navigate this inclusion to create a more cohesive definition of text.</p> Benjamin Kinyanjui Mbatia, Wendo Nabea Copyright (c) 2024 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 https://utafitionline.com/index.php/jltcs/article/view/547 Sat, 18 May 2024 00:00:00 +0000 Influence of Traffic Visual Communication on Road Safety amongst Boda-boda Motorcyclists in Kenyan Cities https://utafitionline.com/index.php/jltcs/article/view/618 <p>This study sought to determine the influence of Traffic Visual Communication on Road Safety amongst <em>Boda–Boda</em> Motorcyclists in Kenyan Cities. These include road signs, symbols, and also road markings. Roadside advertisements and the presence of police all communicate visually. Road safety has become a major concern worldwide due to the high prevalence of death and injury among road users. This study was anchored on the social cognitive theory, the safety culture theory, and the uses and gratification theory. The study used a pragmatic philosophical paradigm with a convergent parallel design of mixed-method research. Stratified sampling and simple random sampling were used to draw the target population of 399 <em>Boda-boda</em> motorcyclists from the four cities in Kenya, namely Nairobi, Mombasa, Kisumu, and Nakuru, a final sample of 399 <em>Boda-boda </em>motorcyclists was made. Quantitative data was collected from the motorcyclists by use of semi-structured questionnaires while key informant interviews were used to collect the qualitative data from experts. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze quantitative data while qualitative data was analyzed using thematic data analysis. The study findings are that visibility and comprehension of traffic signs and markings correlate positively with favourable attitudes toward road safety and self-reported compliance with traffic regulations. The results revealed that traffic visual communication can create synergies, amplify impact, and drive sustainable change in <em>Boda-boda </em>riders' road safety practices. In conclusion, there is a need for innovative multifaceted communication intervention to enhance safety amongst <em>Boda-boda </em>motorcyclists in Kenyan cities. </p> Barbara Nthoki, Caroline Biwott, Alice Kamau Copyright (c) 2024 Journal of Linguistics, Literary and Communication Studies https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0 https://utafitionline.com/index.php/jltcs/article/view/618 Sat, 13 Jul 2024 00:00:00 +0000